Pasta Scarpariello-style

Scarpariello pasta

Don’t we just love the colourful Rowes…? 

Pasta Scarpariello-style

Scarpariello pasta

This week they have thoroughly enjoyed the most simple of dishes, yet so delicious – and… yes, colourful.

This dish is said to originate in the old town of Naples, where in times past the local cobblers were paid in food instead of money. Traditionally made with leftover sauce from the previous day, this dish is now easy and quick to make with readily available ingredients. We followed the guidelines of GialloZafferano (our favourite pasta source) but this recipe is a classic and can be found elsewhere too.

You are going to need: 250g cherry tomatoes on the vine (datterini), 6–8 large fresh basil leaves, ½ fresh red chilli pepper,  clove of garlic, 50g grated parmesan cheese, olive oil and spaghetti (about 150g for two people).

Sauce first: wash and cut in half the tomatoes, de-seed the chilli and chop very fine, grate the garlic clove to a paste (chez  Rowe we use Lakeland’s ginger grater for this purpose: Trota considers it by far the most useful tool in the cartoon kitchen – her ‘desert island’ gadget, since you ask…)

Allora, put a glug of olive oil in a skillet, add the garlic and chilli and fry gently for a minute or so to melt the garlic (gently being the keyword: we don’t want it to burn). Then add the tomato and gently cook for about another 10 minutes until the tomatoes soften.

Meanwhile cook your pasta (spaghetti is required; this time we used wholemeal, but it’s your choice), drain when still very ‘al dente’ (2–3 minutes before they are ready) reserving a cupful of the cooking water. Add the basil leaves and the pasta to the tomato sauce, together with the reserved cooking water and parmesan. Mix well and keep cooking in the skillet for another 2–3 minutes so that the parmesan melts and creates a creamy sauce that coats the spaghetti strands beautifully.

Plate up, add a couple more basil leaves to decorate and another sprinkle of parmesan if you wish and, enjoy!  Sciuè sciuè, or Sciuscià if you prefer: either way, simple cobblers’ fare is flavour of the month chez Rowe.